Maps For The Colorblind

1570

Individuals with color blindness struggle to distinguish between two colors and often end up distressed. This color vision deficiency affects approximately 1 in 12 men (8%) and 1 in 200 women in the world. To put the issue into perspective, we realize there are many people who suffer from some degree of color blindness. This simply means that they have some degree of difficulty perceiving the full-color spectrum under normal lighting conditions. Those with red-green color blindness have difficulty distinguishing red and green hues; those with blue-yellow color blindness have difficulty with blue and green hues.

VIEW OF A COLORED MAP FOR PEOPLE WITH NORMAL VISION

Colored maps can be a major source of frustration for color blind people. Since their eyes fail to detect certain wavelengths of light, the number of different colors they perceive is less than an individual with normal color perception. Research says these visually impaired people have special requirements for reading a colored map. To solve this problem, there are maps that avoid using colors between which a color-blind individual cannot differentiate that is not only readable by the color-vision impaired but also appeal to those with normal color vision. These special world maps are designed by cartographers and we know them as maps for the colorblind.

Buy This Map

A WORLD POLITICAL MAP FOR THE COLORBLIND PEOPLE

There is likely to be at least one child in every classroom that is color blind. Designed especially to work with any form of color blindness, this colorful, easy to read children’s map of the World showing countries and their capitals is ideal for the classroom.

These unique maps from the MapTrove collection help the visually challenged people to easily perceive the world around them. These maps are different from other maps because they make content accessible to a wider range of people with disabilities.

Although there are various new technologies applied in map production, people who are blind and visually impaired still have various challenges to access maps and relevant applications. So, rather than creating separate color schemes for those with various forms of CVD (Color Vision Deficiency) and those without, the cartographers worked on a color palette that would work for everyone.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here